Tips for Finding Spanish Speaking Lessons Online

There are, of course, several different ways to learn a language but these days the world is a smaller place and one of the advantages of this is that we can can learn to speak a chosen language from the comfort of our own home or even office. Maybe a suitable Spanish tutor is not available in your area. If that is the case for you, read these tips for finding Spanish speaking lessons online.

OK, so let us say you have decided to learn Spanish online. You have chosen this route as opposed to going to night school because perhaps you work during the day, or you are a little shy of speaking up in front of a class of other people, or maybe it is difficult for you to travel for any number of reasons.

Yet, within you there is that burning desire to learn the Spanish language and it’s difficult to do it on your own with just a book. Can you motivate yourself sufficiently? What about a bunch of expensive audio files, such as CDs? Would that do the trick? But, maybe, like many students you need interaction, personal encouragement and someone who cares.

One solution to these quandaries is to get a personal online tutor. This is a convenient way to learn to speak Spanish, and also gives you privacy. The aim of that tutor should only be to assist you in the best way possible to reach your objective: to speak, understand and write good Spanish.

But – and here’s the question – how do you find that tutor? The one who is going to help you along your exciting journey.

Remember at school how there was at least one teacher who drove you to snoozing away the lesson at the back of the class? There were two in my case: the history teacher and the geography teacher – and were they dull! Conversely, several years later (and 20 years ago now), I went to an evening class for six sessions on Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. The tutor arrived late and we were becoming restless but as he threw down his briefcase and took off his jacket, he started quoting with passion and we were captivated.

So, this is point 1 – look for an online Spanish tutor who appears able to breathe life into the language. Spanish is a beautiful language and with it comes a fascinating history of Spain, of Latin America and the Spanish-speaking world in general.

Point 2 – Look for a tutor in Spanish who has plenty of experience. Knowing a subject and teaching it are two different things. So check credentials, such as testimonials, where you can. Ask around: recommendations and word of mouth are important.

Point 3 – Pay attention to cost. Too cheap and it may be a waste of money. Too pricey and you may be getting stung. Check out standard hourly charges for your area or country. Are discounts available for multiple lessons or lessons booked in advance? Is there any follow up between lessons, such as homework?

Point 4 – Are you looking to learn Spanish for a particular reason: business, pleasure, travel, personal? Ensure you locate a tutor who is prepared to be flexible and tailor the lessons to suit your interests and level.

Point 5 – Find the right tutor and you will learn fast! No time for snoozing at the back of the classroom. That is not what you, or your company, is paying for.

Point 6 – Work hard! Languages cannot be learned in six weeks but you will be on your way…

5 Tips to Buy Children’s Apps

With the festival season not very far away, many children are about to receive electronic gifts from their family and relatives. The good news is that apps have emerged as a promising tool to support literacy in general, and science, mathematics and life skills. The challenge for parents is to pick up the right app, more so, if the child has autism spectrum disorder or has special needs.

#1 The education and entertainment combo

Kids learn when they’re engaged. Educational apps like Just Match or Math on the Farm forge a perfect balance between learning and engagement. The Math on the Farm app teaches mathematics skills in a fun way. Here, the child has to answer multiple-choice type questions to score points. The stories in the app are themed on a farm that has flowers, vegetables, domestic animals, and cattle. Bright colors and interactive animation are the highlights of this app. It’s important that the child learns by playing and the Math on the Farm app does just that.

#2 Play with your child

Studies have shown that children learn better if parents join the fun. Take an active role and choose and app that’s likely to hold your kid’s attention. The Just Match app could be perfect for you. This fun educational app teaches matching skills, where you’ll be shown to game figures and an outline which matches only one of them. You’ve to drag and match the figure with the outline. A lively animation will hail your efforts every time you match correctly.

#3 Select appropriate games

Determine whether a fun educational app is correct for your child. Not all four-year old will be equal. So, different apps would appeal to different kids at different times. Ask yourself whether your child will be able to follow the app’s storyline. The touch screen system is a major advancement in the field of communication. Make sure the fun educational app has audio cues and not only words.

#4 Set limits and encourage other playing and learning forms

Well, setting the proper “media diet” is important for your child. It’s almost like balanced food. The more variety, the better it’s for your child. Consider the number of hours the child will spend in front of a screen. A possible rule could be not allowing TV until the homework is complete. The same should apply to a touch screen, unless it’s required in school, which of course is increasingly happening these days.

#5 Download from reliable, trusted sources

Look for established brands that specialize in fun educational apps. Are you comfortable with the app’s characters? Kids imitate popular media characters. Make sure the language and behavior in fun educational apps are appropriate for your kids. Avoid apps that have a lot of violence or are frightening to play. Such apps may have an adverse impact on the child’s mind. The Math on the Farm and Just Match app can fit the bill perfectly. These two apps are sensitive to children’s needs, and are among the best fun educational apps around.

Easy Tips for Scoring High in GRE

GRE is an exam which you have to score high if you are aiming for your Master’s abroad. It is a really competitive exam and hence it is important that you grab a high score. A high score in GRE is just one aspect apart from your academic credentials, projects, and internship work. All these elements are equally important however by scoring high in GRE, you boost your chances of a successful admit from your Dream University. Before starting your online GRE preparation, take a diagnostic test and prepare a custom study plan based on your strengths and weaknesses. Follow the study plan rigorously along with enough practice and achieve your high GRE score. Some of the expert tips for securing a high score in GRE are as below:

Effectively manage time: You have a fixed time limit. Start solving questions faster or mark difficult questions and come back to them later. With GRE preparation online, you should take a lot of GRE practice that gives you the real feel.

Avoid silly mistakes: Don’t jump into answering. Take a while before choosing your answer. Even one point higher means a lot when it comes to competitive exams like GRE.

Use substitution method: Whenever possible use 0 and 1 in places of equations. Sometimes you can even substitute the answer choices to complete the equation and determine the right answer.

Check for GRE preparation Online which offers adaptive tests to help you practice these simple yet effective tips.

Adopt divide and rule policy: If the mathematical problem is too wordy, break it down into parts for better clarity. This will avoid rereading the question multiple times.

Pay better attention: If there are graphs, take your time in analyzing it completely before jumping into answering like read the title, the metrics, axis values etc.

Practice a lot: Take a lot of practice tests as a part of your online GRE preparation before you give your GRE.

Build your vocab: Having a strong vocab is a key when it comes to scoring high in GRE verbal.

Attempt GRE RC at the end: If you are nervous about the time, tackle RC at the end. In RC don’t read questions first. Do make notes.

Set your biological clock: Take the GRE practice test as a part of your online GRE preparation at the same time as your GRE time. This ensures that you are at your attentive best during the test.

Take enough rest: Get a good night’s rest before the exam. We cannot stress enough on how important a good night’s sleep before the test is. It helps you relax on the final day and keeps you focused and attentive.

Easy and Practical Tips to Help Your Children With Their Math Homework

It doesn’t matter what level of school your child is currently enrolled in, it’s always a good idea to get them thinking about math. The reality is that if they want to go on to further education and a great career, a solid background in math is going to be absolutely crucial. You can help them get there by really taking the time to help them with their math homework. You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to pull this off, as they are likely to already have some sort of grasp of what they are doing in class. Here are a few tips that you can use to help tutor your child with their math homework:

  1. Teach the basics first – you have to be able to walk before you can run, so make sure that your child understands the basics of math, as this will help them when they progress to more complex subjects. Flash cards are a great way to achieve this goal.
  2. Neat numbers – mathematical equations can be confusing enough without making them impossible to read. Try to make sure that your child writes down numbers and equations neatly, as this often makes them a little easier to see and understand.
  3. Master before moving on – make sure that your child fully grasps the problem they are working on before moving on to the next math problem.
  4. Get interactive – having your face stuck in a text book can be more than a little dull, so try to make learning fun by using object around the house that can be used to help solve math problems.
  5. Ask for a little more – ask your child to answer a few extra questions when they are doing their homework assignments. Going that extra mile will help ensure that they really do understand the mathematical concepts they are being taught.
  6. Test them regularly – when you are out and about with your child, pose them some questions to see how quickly they answer. For example, if you are grocery shopping and see a price has been marked down, ask them to quickly tell you how much the difference is between the old price and the new.
  7. Make time to study – try to get in the habit of studying at the same time every day, making sure it is at a time when you have no other commitments and can commit all the time to your child.
  8. Maintain a steady pace – don’t try to rush your child ahead, even if you are sure they are ready to move to the next level. Maintain a steady pace and always take time to recap what they have already learned.
  9. Keep at it – if your child is having a particularly difficult time with a particular concept, stick with it until they finally get it.
  10. Encourage – always be sure to praise your child for a job well done. Math can be tough for a young mind, so encourage them every step of the way.

If you have tried to really get involved with your child’s math homework, but still find that they are struggling, it might be time to consider a math tutor. You might just be surprised at how affordable math tutoring is, and you may be even more surprised at the great results your child will be able to achieve.

12 Tips For Involving Parents in the IEP Process

As special education teachers one of our main responsibilities is to develop Individual Education Programs (IEP’s) along with a team of individuals including the child’s parents or caregivers. The process is very time consuming for Special Education teachers. It is not usual spend upwards to several hours just gathering information and getting ready to conduct the IEP meeting as well as write it. Some IEP’s are only a few pages long but others, especially for a child who needs many services, can be twenty or more pages.

The purpose of the IEP is for a team to develop goals and objectives as well as outlining services the child needs for the at least the next year. IEP’s are written annually and some require revising or writing more often.

Each individual on the team is supposed to have input into helping develop the IEP goals. The key term here is “supposed”. While some team members are more involved than others, the burden of producing and writing a correct IEP is on the Special Education teacher.

As often happens, the Spec. Ed. teacher arranges the meeting, sends out the needed notices to the participants and then will write the IEP. While the goals and objectives are usually written during the meeting itself, the Spec. Ed. teacher has a good idea as to what goals to include. She has also spent time writing the narratives for other parts of the IEP.

Team members who are invited to the meeting have little or no input into the process and will just show up to sign the document produced. Ideally, the team members who should have most of the input into the IEP are the Spec. Ed teacher, classroom teacher, key support personnel and the parents.

The struggle that most Spec. Ed. teachers face is how to get the parents to become more of a participant in the IEP. Parents along with their child are the key stake holders in developing an appropriate IEP. What can Spec. Ed teachers do to get parents more involved in the process?

Here are 12 tips for Special Ed teachers to get the parent involved in the process:

1. Prior to the IEP meeting, the Special Ed. teacher should interview the parent to see what their concerns are for their child and what goals and objectives they would like to see implemented in the IEP.

2. At least a week before the meeting, send home a list of possible goals and objectives for the parent to review and make additions to or corrections to them.

3. Probably the most important is to set a time for the meeting that is mutually agreeable to all but most especially the parent.

4. Be sure during the meeting to welcome comments and concern that the parent may have. Ask questions specifically addressed to them. Don’t let anyone interrupt them.

5. If a parent begins to speak, let them and be sure that others allow time for them to talk as well. If team members feel the need to talk among themselves while the parent is talking, ask them to go out of the room so that a parent does not have to compete with others attention.

6. Keep a steady flow of communication with the parents all the time – not just at the IEP meeting.

7. Keep the parent appraised of what is happening with their child. This means not just report card or parent conference time. This means at other times as well. This way the parent can know what is working and what isn’t working.

8. Let the parent know of successes their child has experienced as well as what things need to be done differently.

9. During the meeting be sure to acknowledge the parent as a part of the team and let the other members of the team know that what they are saying and discussing is important.

10. As teachers we get very attached to the children we work with, especially those that we work with for multiple years. It is important that we keep in mind that this child, for whom we are meeting, is not our child but belongs to the parent. We may not always agree with the parent but their wishes should be considered and acknowledged.

11. The most important skill we can develop as facilitators of meetings is to listen, listen and listen when the parent talks. This means active listening – with eyes and ears.

12. Lastly, let the parent know that you care about their child and about them as a family. Parents of children with Special Needs often need reassuring that their child is a part of the classroom, has friends and others who care for them.

Try these tips and see if they help to get parents more involved in the IEP process.